International Symposium on Social Determinants of NCDs in Mediterranean Countries

The magnitude of inequities in health varies within and between countries. Worldwide, however, poorer socio-economic groups or classes suffer worse health than more affluent sections of society. Life expectancies are lower and needs for health care greater in the least advantaged populations, and this prognosis applies as much to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) as to communicable diseases. This Symposium will bring together the latest evidence on health inequalities and the social determinants of health in the countries of the Eastern and Southern Mediterranean, with a focus on the implications of the rise in NCDs.

The Symposium is being organised by a network of public health research institutes in the region which have come together with partners in the UK and Ireland and with WHO-EMRO in a research project to enhance research capacity in public health, with a focus on NCDs. This project, RESCAP-MED, is funded by the European Union.

Organisers particularly encourage the submission of Abstracts from researchers who are at an early or mid-career stage. We invite applications from a range of disciplines, including social epidemiology, medical sociology or anthropology, medical geography, environmental health, health policy analysis and health economics.

Following the Symposium, Dokuz Eylul University (DEU) is co-hosting a two-day course with colleagues from University of Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona which researchers from RESCAP-MED partner countries may find valuable to attend.

We sincerely invite you to join us in this event. With your support and participation, we believe the Symposium will enjoy greater triumph.

On the behalf of the Organising Committee
Prof. Belgin Unal & Prof. Peter Phillimore

RESCAPMED SYMPOSIUM ORGANISING COMMITTEE

Belgin Ünal Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey
Yücel Demiral Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey
Abla Mehio Sibai American University of Beirut, Lebanon
Niveen Abu-rmeileh Birzeit University, Occupied Palestinian Territory
Shahaduz Zaman Newcastle University, UK
Habiba Ben Rhomdane University of Tunis, Tunisia
Fouad Fouad Syrian Center for Tobacco Studies, Syria
Wasim Maziak Syrian Center for Tobacco Studies, Syria
Yousef Saleh Khader Jordan Univ. Science&Technology, Jordan
Awad Mataria WHO-EMRO

MAIN TOPICS
•Inequalities in health global and country perspectives
•Inequalities in developing and developed countries
•NCDs mortality and morbidity in different countries and populations
•Prevention and inequalities in NCDs
•Treatment and inequalities in NCDs
•Avoidable mortalities in NCDs
•Work life and NCDs
•Psychosocial factors and NCDs
•Social classes and NCDs
•Gender and NCDs
•Migration and NCDs
•Ethnicity and NCDs
•Environment and NCDs
•Social capital and inequalities
•Economics in NCDs

Monday, 6th May 2013

09.00-09.30

Registration

09.30-09.45

Opening and welcome

09.45-10.30

Keynote lecture: Inequalities in health and the rise of NCD: a global perspective

10.30-11.00

Break

11.00-12.00

Special session •Inequalities in NCDs and WHO Perspectives
•Economics of NCDs

12.00-13.00

Free paper session

13.00-14.30

Lunch

14.30-15.30

Country reports on inequalities in NCD •Tunisia
•Jordan
•Palestine

15.30-16.30

Break

16.30-17.30

Country reports on inequalities in NCD •Turkey
•Iran
•Morocco

Tuesday, 7th May 2013

09:15-10.00

Keynote lecture: A social scientist’s view of the challenges of NCD in low and middle income countries

10.00-10.30

Break

10.30-11.30

Special session: •Gender Disparities and NCD
•Work life and inequalities

11.30-12.30

Free paper session

12.30-14.00

Lunch

14.00-14.45

Keynote lecture: Socioeconomic inequalities in cardiovascular risk factors

14.45-15.45

Country reports on inequalities in NCD •Egypt
•Syria
•Lebanon

15.45-16.15

Break

16.15-17.00

Lessons learned: Final discussion and close

Contact Person

Yücel Demiral
info@rescapistanbul2013.org

CEVAP VER

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