CELEBRATING EXCELLENT SPACE SCIENCE TEACHING COMPETITION

competition
teaching competition

CELEBRATING EXCELLENT SPACE SCIENCE TEACHING COMPETITION

OVERVIEW INFORMATION

Throughout Europe (and beyond!) enthusiastic teachers, parents and educators like yourself are finding ways to creatively use the Space Awareness resources in inspiring young people with space science.  We want to celebrate the benefits that your hard work has achieved, and share your successes so that your peers can learn from them.  Enter our competition now to win!

There are two main prize categories:

  • Inspiring young people from diverse backgrounds with space science
  • Supporting young people to become aware of space-related careers

So, whether you teach students from mixed socio-economic communities, manage diverse cultural backgrounds within your classroom, have focused specifically on encouraging girls into space careers, or have creatively met the needs of young people with special needs, we want to hear about your experiences. We are also keen to celebrate actions which have supported young people to aspire to careers in space-related science and technology.

Steps to participate

  1. Choose which of the Space Awareness resources work well in your classroom, home or other educational environment.You may choose an activity from any one of the following broad categories:
    • Educational activity: http://www.space-awareness.org/en/activities/
    • Citizen science repository: http://www.space-awareness.org/en/games/
    • Space Scoop: http://www.space-awareness.org/en/scoops/
    • Careers Hub
      • Interviews: http://www.space-awareness.org/en/careers/#interviews_menu
      • Careers profiles: http://www.space-awareness.org/en/careers/#careers_menu
      • Webinars: http://www.space-awareness.org/en/careers/#webinars_menu
      • Teaching materials: http://www.space-awareness.org/en/careers/#teaching_material_menu
  2. Think about what evidence you have of your participants’ engagement and inspiration when using those resources (you may want to look at some of our recommended assessment tools to help you with this: http://www.space-awareness.org/en/skills/#assessment-tools-anchor)
  3. Decide an entry category and fill in the entry form (available here) to ‘show and tell’ your story
  4. Review the competition terms and conditions (available here) and submit your entry via email to [email protected]  Note: within any correspondence please clearly state which national-level contest (see list of National Contest Organisers below) you are planning to submit your entry to, so that we can ensure your entry or enquiry reaches the right people.

Judging process

The entries will be considered at two stages:

  1. National contests, organised by volunteers involved in space outreach activities in these countries. Where there is no national contest, individuals, groups or organisations from anywhere in the world can submit in English to enter the “global contest”.  There will be one winner and one runner up in each of these contests.
  2. The winner per category from each national contest (plus the winner per category from the global contest) will be entered into the international final. These winning entries will be translated into English and judged by an international panel of judges including space science experts and education specialists, e.g. from the European Space Agency (ESA).

The criteria for the awards are:

  • Impact and evidence – Did your participants experience a change of perspective, and how important was this change?
  • Alignment with Space Awareness – to what extent has the entry built on the chosen Space Awareness resource?
  • Creativity and innovation – how have you incorporated the resource into your classroom, home or other educational environment?
  • Sharing good practice – clear advice points and learning tips to help other teachers, parents and educators take a similar approach in the future.
  • Suitability for a specific target group – we particularly encourage entries which demonstrate success in engaging traditionally under-represented groups in space careers (e.g. girls, ethnic minorities and/or reaching children and young people from relatively disadvantaged socio-economic communities).

Prizes

The international final winner will receive:

  • Quality Lighting Teaching Kit to increase student and public awareness of light pollution issues and “quality lighting” solutions.
  • Space Awareness Climate Box educational kit, which contains a suite of activities targeted at advancing learning about the Earth’s climate, different measuring techniques and climate change.
  • Rosetta toy. The Rosetta plush toy is 33 cm high, 16 cm deep, and a whopping 95.5 centimetres wide! Little Philae sits on its partner Rosetta and together they have traversed our Solar System on a 12 year long mission to study comet 67P.

The international final runner-up will receive:

  • Space Awareness Climate Box educational kit, which contains a suite of activities targeted at advancing learning about the Earth’s climate, different measuring techniques and climate change.
  • Rosetta toy. The Rosetta plush toy is 33 cm high, 16 cm deep, and a whopping 95.5 centimetres wide! Little Philae sits on its partner Rosetta and together they have traversed our Solar System on a 12 year long mission to study comet 67P.

The national contest winners will receive:

  • Firstcope telescope. This quality Dobsonian style telescope features a 76 mm aperture reflector optical tube. FirstScope is an ideal entry level astronomical telescope to use in schools.
  • Space Awareness teacher resource kit.

The national contest runner upwill receive:

  • Space Awareness teacher resource kit.

All winners will also receive recognition badges for schools & individuals, and the publication of the finalist submissions on the Space Awareness website.

Any questions?

Choose from the following options to help answer any queries you may have:

  • Take a look at our Frequently Asked Questions page (available here).
  • Send us an email: [email protected]

Note: within any correspondence please clearly state which national-level contest (see list of National Contest Organisers below) you are planning to submit your entry to, so that we can ensure your entry or enquiry reaches the right people.

IMPORTANT DATES

Date Activity description
1 June 2017 Competition launched.
14 October 2017 Competition closes end of World Space Week.
31 October 2017 National and Global contest winners (international finalists) announced.

Finalist entries will be translated into English for consideration at the International Final.

21 November 2017 International winners announced.

Finalist case studies published on the Space Awareness website.

NATIONAL COMPETITIONS

  • Belgium (French) – Gert Smet (Planetarium of the Royal Belgian Observatory)
  • Brazil (Portuguese) – Marcelo de Oliveira Souza (Louis Cruls Astronomy Club)
  • Bulgaria (Bulgarian) – Ivo Jokin (Municipal Center for Extracurricular Activities, Pleven Region)
  • Germany (German) – Markus Nielbock (Haus der Astronomie)
  • Greece (Greek) – Eleftheria Tsourlidaki (Ellinogermaniki Agogi)
  • India (Tamil and English) – Surender Ponnalagar (Audacious Dreams Foundation)
  • Netherlands (Dutch) – Wouter Schrier (Leiden University)
  • Nigeria (English) – Kingsley Chukwudi Okpala (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nigeria, Nsukka)
  • Poland (Polish) – Milena Ratajczak (New Space Foundation)
  • Portugal (Portuguese) – Nuno Gomes  (Nuclio)
  • Romania (Romanian) – Virgil Pop (ROSA)
  • Spain (Spanish) – Amelia Ortiz (University of Valencia, Astronomical Observatory)
  • United Kingdom (English) – Edward Gomez (Las Cumbres Observatory)
  • Global Contest (English only)* – Uma Patel (University College London)

*For countries where there is no national contest University College London (UCL) will act as global contest organiser. Individuals, groups or organisations can submit their entries to the Global Contest in English.

CEVAP VER

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